Milos


Milos is situated in the western Cyclades. It has an area of 150 km˛ with about 5000 people living there. It makes it one of the bigger islands with the Cyclades. Like Santorin it is volcanic which makes it very interesting. There are hot springs, quite a few interesting sites and some fantastic beaches.

The island became world famous through an archaeological find. The Venus de Milos is one of the most famous artefacts ever discovered. The statue from the first century was excavated in 1820 and is considered one (if not the) example of Ancient Greek statuary. It is now on display in the Louvre in Paris.

Milos Bay

The vast majority of tourists visiting the Cyclades ignore Milos. In a way that is wrong but of course there are good reasons. The most obvious one is the fact that Milos is surprisingly difficult to reach. There is no international airport and it is not on any of the major ferry routes that connect the Cyclades with Athens. As a result you'll hardly meet any package holiday makers but backpackers and independent travellers instead.

Another although less obvious reason is the fact that the locals do not actually depend on tourism. They really don't care that much. The island is rich in minerals and ores. The mines are well hidden but if you are interested in mining give it a go anyways. Milos has rich deposits of ore, minerals and crystals; pumice, sulphur, betonit, kaolin and perlite for example.

There are three bigger settlements on the island: Adamas, Plaka and Pollonia.

Adamas

Adamas - the Port of Milos

The harbour town Adamas is the main settlement on the island. Approximately 2000 people live here. Most visitors not only arrive here but also stay in one of the local hotels. There are plenty of rooms to rent, hotels and restaurants but also a little mining museum (entrance is free) which is quite interesting.

Adamas is ideal as a base if you want to discover the islands. From here he can get pretty much everywhere by bus. From here you can also book a day trip to Antimilos. The island is uninhabited but quite interesting. A day trip will cost about 16 Euro.

5 kilometres out of town is a camp site. During season their mini van will pick you up at the port.


Plaka

Plaka in Milos


Plaka is the old capital of Milos. It is only about 6 kilometres north of Adamas. It is up in the hill hills and does well worth a visit. Most notably you will find the typical narrow alleys. Other than that there might be little to see but it is a chilled out and rather friendly place.

Pollonia: The town is also known as Apollonia. It is situated at the eastern shore. Apollonia turned into a bit of a touristy village. There are a number of cheap rooms and even a small port for boats to Kimilos. As far as views go the village wouldn't be my first choice. The old mines above the town spoil it a bit; unless you like the sight of an old, shut down mine.


If you go to Milos make sure you visit the ancient Roman town of Tripiti. The excavation there shows an old theatre.

Kimolos: The small island just next to Milos is a popular destination for day trippers. There are 5 boats a day from Pollonia to Kimolos. One way cost only about 2 Euros. If you wish you can spend the night but the rooms on the small Kimolos are relatively expensive. You'll probably end up paying 35-40 Euro for a double.

Getting to Milos:
By plane – there is a small airport on Milos. There are no international flights though. On average there are about two flights a day to Athens. To make things worse there is no way to get to the airport other than a taxi. They will charge you at least 8 Euro to Adamas or what ever they want. The lack of international airport makes the island attractive for individual travellers though.

Ferry – there is a direct ferry to Piraeus that during summer will go up to 3 times a day. More or less every day you can go to Sifnos and Serifos, other islands are a lot more difficult to reach though. There are a few boats every week that go to Paros, Sikinos, Folegandros and Crete. Even rarer are ferries to Santorini or Ios. The guys at the port are very helpful though when it comes to finding a connecting ferry. Just ask them and they can most likely sort you out.

Getting around Milos:
During season there are 6-8 busses a day that connect the bigger settlements on the island. On top there are a number of busses that go to the beaches down south. To get to the more or less uninhabited south-west you need a scooter. They can be rented in Adamas. Also popular are cycling and hiking.

 
Greece Island
German Version
General Info
  Transport
  Accommendation
  Greek Food
  Greek Drinks
  Money
  Information
  Media
The Islands
 Cyclades
  Santorini
  Thira Perissa Kamari
  Naxos
  Naxos Chora Apollonas Tragea
  Small Cyclades
  Paros
  Ios
  Amorgos
  Mykonos
  Tinos
  Andros
  Syros
  Anafi
  Antiparos
  Sikinos
  Folegandros
  Milos
  Sifnos
  Serifos
  Kythnos
  Kea
  Dodecanese
  Rhodes
  Kos
  Karpathos
  Kasos
  Halki
  Symi
  Tilos
  Nisyros
  Astypalea
  Pserimos
  Kalymnos
  Leros
  Patmos
  Arki
  Lipsi
  Kastelorizo
  Crete
  North Aegean
  Samos
  Chios
  Fourni
  Psara
  Inousses
  Lesbos
  Samothrace
  Thasos
  Icaria
  Lemnos
  Ionian Islands
  Corfu
  Paxos
  Lefkas
  Kefalonia
  Ithaka
  Zakynthos
  Kythira
  Saronic Islands
  Sporades
  Skiathos
  Skopelos
  Alonissos
  Skyros